Traditional Worship Music

Traditional – in most cases, the extreme is music that is quite old, more than 30, 40, or 50 years old. The term traditional is used because it’s what churches have traditionally done in their music and worship for decades. It is their “tradition” and each church has it’s own. I helped in a revival a few weeks ago and the music they “normally” sang was southern gospel hymns I had never even heard before (and I was raised in a traditional church).

The positives of traditional music in worship are
1) it helps the worshiper who has a connection with the song – spiritually and/or emotionally. Many claim “Amazing Grace” as their favorite hymn due to some past spiritual or emotional experience with the song. Every time it is sung, they immediately connect with God through it’s text and music because they remember this great and awesome past experience and it encourages them in their faith.
2) traditional hymns have a depth of doctrine that is not found very often in the contemporary music. Many hymns speak of the greatness of God in a way that expounds upon a believer’s knowledge of the Scriptures. These hymns speak in language that is not spoken regularly and therefore lift “new” expressions of worship to God.

The negatives of traditional music in worship are
1) a new believer with no past connection to the hymn, might easily get “bored” with the archaic language and strophic nature (same tune with many stanzas).
2) Younger believers connect with God through music styles that they hear on a regular basis. They seem more drawn to worship when they hear musical stylings that imitate or recreate what they hear on their radios,CDs, and I-pods – and nothing in mainstream music resembles the hymn (except some classical music).

Next Blog – Contemporary Worship

I hope God blesses you in your search for him. Jeremiah 29:13 tells us that when we seek him (God) with all our heart, we will find him.

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